Oysterband play modern folk-based British music, acoustic at heart, sometimes rocking. Since 1978 they've toured in 35 countries - festivals, concerts, bars, rallies, jails - They won 5 BBC Folk Awards and made 13 studio albums and one DVD.
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From: Kent (originally)
Website: http://www.oysterband.co.uk/
Cost: £25 for the session, or get a weekend ticket.
Oysterband 2022

When to see Oysterband

The main marquee (Sandpit Field) in Friday evening’s concert. Click here to see the other bands playing in that session.

Don’t forget to buy your tickets early.

Festival locations

Events are located around the town centre, mainly Sandpit Field and Shore road. Click here for a map of the locations.

Tickets

Get tickets for the whole weekend, or for individual concerts. Click here for more details.

Oysterband

Oysterband play modern folk-based British music, acoustic at heart, sometimes rocking. Since 1978 they’ve toured in 35 countries – festivals, concerts, bars, rallies, jails – They won 5 BBC Folk Awards and made 13 studio albums and one DVD.

Oysterband consists of

  • John Jones (vocal, melodeon),
  • Alan Prosser (guitars, vocal),
  • Ian Telfer (violin, keyboard, vocal)
  • Dil Davies (drums),
  • Al Scott (bass guitar, mandolin, vocal),
  • Adrian Oxaal (cello, guitar, vocal).

Oysterband (originally The Oyster Band) is an English electric folk, folk rock, and folk punk band formed in Canterbury in or around 1976. The band formed in parallel to Fiddler’s Dram, and under the name Oyster Ceilidh Band played purely as a dance band at first. The name Oyster comes from the group’s early association with the coastal town of Whitstable in East Kent, known for the quality of its oysters.

Around 1978 “The Oyster Ceilidh Band”  soon started experimenting with radical arrangements of traditional songs and with home recording, and even put out 4 albums in the early 80s. These sound harmless enough now, but at the time their home-made, try-anything attitude was controversial. They were determined that traditional music should not be just a branch of the heritage industry.